Public Art
 

Not the Same but the Same Knot

2022

Knots are something many of us use every day. Whether we are trying our shoes, strapping down furniture, securing ourselves when in high places, tethering a boat to a dock, or simply making crafts, we are all using knots. 

 

For this project I am combining the use of knots, retired climbing rope, a tall totem form, and various colors as a representation of the differences and similarities that we all share as a community and society. I believe our difference are vitally important as well as making the world an interesting place and our similarities are what bring us together and create unity and connectedness between those differences. 

 

The form is that of a single tall totem like structure that serves as a symbol of unity, as totems typically do. The form is to be wrapped with repeated half hitch knots, a symbol of our universal connection. This is also known as a simple over hand knot. This knot is used by people throughout the world to create security and serves as the perfect metaphor for what connects us all. Furthermore, the historical use of knots for recording information in place of language continues to support the idea that connectedness surpasses language barriers and works as a form that we can all read. 

 

 I am also incorporating a variety of color to signify the how diversity can be intertwined to create a cohesive entity of inclusivity and harmony. The color variations we be applied by incorporating parts of different rock-climbing ropes that I have collected from climbers. As a climber myself, I have chosen to use retired rock-climbing rope as the main material in this project because creating a low carbon footprint is an important principle for me, not only as a rock climber but as a good steward of the Earth. Moreover, the ropes have been collected from various people and places and further supports my concept of how similarities and differences combine to create unity. 

Not the Same but the Same Knot

Texas Hope

collaborative project with Kirsten Maiwald, 2021

For this project we wanted to visually showcase the history of Fort Worth, Texas as well as the beauty of the original building. To do this we decided to work with the existing markings on the wall, leave some of the wall exposed, and develop a contemporary design with a Fort Worth flair.

Leaving some exposed brick to highlight the 109 year old building was a central design element and the black blocks are a nod to the original Artspace111 signage.

The ultramarine ovals are inspired by the Texas bluebonnets that spring up off our beautiful Fort Worth highways, while the chartreuse forms are abstracted versions of the unmistakable Texas prickly pear cactus.

The prickly pear cactus are made up of a combination of swirls that intersect in different ways along the design. The swirls are a symbol of hope. They remind us that we are all connected in the universe and it is our civil duty to take care of each other, embrace our community and always have hope for a bright future.

Artspace111 mural- Texas Hope .jpg